About Bob Hahn Photography & Scuba

Bob has been a professional photographer for more than 40 years, specializing in corporate, industrial, travel and leisure and underwater photography. His interest in scuba and photography takes him to the Caribbean, Florida, Northeast US and his home area Dutch Springs in Pennsylvania. He is a PADI Master Instructor and teaches many PADI Specialty Courses. Bob is an Olympus certified underwater photography instructor. Bob is a member of the American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP)

Raymondskill Falls

The Raymondskill Falls are located in the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (N41° 17.413? W74° 50.461). The falls are a series of three cascading waterfalls making them the highest falls in Pennsylvania, totaling about 150 feet in height.

 

There are two viewing areas, one above the top waterfall and one near the bottom of the second drop. The trail between them is short, fairly step and uneven.

 

There are two parking areas. Following the trail to your right will take you from the upper parking lot to the viewing area showing you a view of the pool and the top of the falls.

From the upper viewing area follow the trail down to the lower viewing area. This viewing area provides a great photo opportunity of the falls. This viewing area is accessed from a trail from the upper falls or from the lower parking lot.

During periods of high water you’ll be able to see another narrow waterfall flowing just to the side of lowest tier.#BobHahnPhoto #GetOlympus #Nature #PAStateGamelands110

There are no marked trails to the bottom of the falls. There is a trail that can be seen on the other side of the fence that leads down to the bottom. The trail is narrow and very slippery, use extreme caution.

 

There are four waterfalls that are further upstream. These range in height from 10 to 25 feet tall, but are powerful when Raymondskill Falls is flowing well. To get to these falls, from the top of the upper waterfalls, go over a small hill. At the top of the hill, you’ll see a path that follows along Raymondskill Creek. The underbrush is very sparse, making it easy to make your own path along the creek. The banks are steep making photographs of these waterfalls difficult.

Another way to view falls up stream you can drive up Raymondskill Road. Turn left out of the parking area and go to the first bridge, the last of the four waterfalls is visible from the bridge. There is a small parking area just past the bridge. Cross the road proceed through the woods on the left side of the creek. The underbrush is very sparse, making it easy to make your own path along the creek.

Photographing Backyard Birds

This is the first in a series for backyard bird photography.

The first part of this blog is about how to attract birds to your backyard.

Bird photography is a growing passion among enthusiast photographers.

First thing to do is to build or purchase a bird feeders.  I’m going to show you how to build feeders branches from your trees.  This will  give you a natural setting to place you feed.

To be successful with bird photography you need to some advanced planning. To start you need a feeder to attract the birds. I build my own feeders using natural materials. 

Building Feeders

Plan your feeder to make it look natural. I build them out of drop off wood from my trees.

#BirdsFeedr#BobHahnPhoto #GetOlympus #Bethlehem #PA

Bird tray feeders give you a better view of the birds.

#BobHahnPhoto #GetOlympus #Bethlehem #PA #Birds #BirdFeeder #Nature #Animals

Bird Feeder Anchor

Be sure you put a good anchor in the ground to support the feeder, I use to 1/2 inch pipe about it 18 inches long cemented into the ground. I then another pipe about the feet long and connect the bird feeder to that pipe. I have several anchors in my yard so I can easily move the feeder to different locations depending on the time of the year. I locate the feeder so I have a natural background of trees.

When you place your feeder keep in mind the angle of the sun and other elements that could cause shadows. Also watch your background, be sure you are not seeing your neighbors house or car.

Bird Feeder

Feeder with clear Plexiglass glass

I make a roof over the feeder with clear Plexiglass glass. This protects the bird feed when it’s raining and gives the birds cover but does not reduce the light hitting the feeder.

#BobHahnPhoto #GetOlympus #Bethlehem #PA #BirdsFeeder #Nature #Animals

Camouflage Deck Door

I removed the door from my screened in porch and made a Camouflage door by using Camouflage material found online and PVC pipe. https://tinyurl.com/y8lkqbhk.

What’s in Bob’s bag
OM-D E-M1 Mark II
M.Zuiko 40-150mm F2.8 Pro
M.Zuiko ED 300mm F4.0 IS Pro
M.Zuiko Digital 1.4x Teleconverter MC-14
M.Zuiko 12-40mm F2.8 Pro
M.Zuiko 7-14mm F2.8 Pro
M.Zuiko ED 8mm F1.8 Fisheye Pro
M.Zuiko ED 12-100mm f4.0 IS Pro
M.Zuiko 17mm f:2.8 Lens
M.Zuiko ED 60mm f2.8 Macro
Manfrotto MHXPRO-BHQ2 XPRO Ball Head
Manfrotto 265CB CF Tripod
Manfrotto 290 Carbon Fiber Monopod

Next blog

Making your backyard bird friendly and Choosing the type of bird feed.

 

Aruba Underwater Photo Safari 2018

This was our seventh Aruba Photo Safari. This year we spent more time touring and photographing the island. In the sixteen years I have been visiting Aruba I have never seen the water as rough and currents as strong as this year. Carlos from Mermaid Sport Dives told us it was because of high winds and storms out in the Atlantic.

Barcadera Reef

Barcadera Reef

Dantchi’s Delight Reef

Photos Around The Island

Olympus OM-D/EM1 Mark II in a was PT-EP14 Underwater Housing and PPO-E04 Dome Lens Port use for the underwater photographs. Lighting was two Fantasea Radiant 1600 Video Lights. OM-D/EM1 Mark II was used for all the land photographs.

What’s in Bob’s Bag:

OM-D E-M1 Mark II
M.Zuiko 40-150mm F2.8 Pro
M.Zuiko Digital 1.4x Teleconverter MC-14
M.Zuiko 12-40mm F2.8 Pro
M.Zuiko 7-14mm F2.8 Pro
M.Zuiko ED 12-100mm f4.0 IS Pro
M.Zuiko 17mm f:2.8 Lens
M.Zuiko ED 60mm f2.8 Macro
ED Zuiko 8mm f/3.5 Fisheye Lens
Zuiko 70-300mm f/4.0-5.6 ED Lens
MMF-3 Four Thirds Adapter
EC-14 1.4x Teleconverter
Olympus Tough TG4
Pen E-PL7

For more information Aruba Underwater Photo Safari 2019 visit our website
www.underwaterphotoclasses.com/workshops.html

Barbados Scuba Diving

Aside

Trunkfish

Trunkfish, Lobster Reef, Bridgetown, , Barbados, © 2017 Bob Hahn

Barbados is a small island located in the lesser Antilles in the Caribbean. It was part of Great Britain and is now an independent nation.

I found it a good destination for scuba diving in the Caribbean.  With his visibility of 50 to 75 feet and warm calm water.  Below is a series of photographs taken on my recent trip.  I dove with the ECO Dive located at House of Pillars, Cavens Lane, Bridgetown, St. Michael, Barbados. (www.ecodivebarbados.com Tel. (246) 243-5816 – Email: dive@ecodivebarbados.com)

We went on four dive sites over two days for first was as Asta Reef in the second was Carlysle Bay Marine Park, this was my favorite diver site on the island with calm waters and 6 shipwrecks in close proximity. We were able see three on the dive. The second day we went to  Shark Reef and Lobster Reef, current was strong on Shark Reef  but otherwise a good dive.

ECO Dive’s boat holds six people which makes it a great place to get personal attention. Andrew Western, Instructor/Manager and Michael Waltress, Divemaster and captain of the boat did a great job showing me where to find good subjects for photography. I highly recommend that if you’re going to Barbados contact them, their service was excellent and Andrew’s knowledge of diving and photography very helpful to great photographs.

Thank you Andrew and Michael.

Olympus OM-D/EM1 Mark II in a was PT-EP14 Underwater Housing and PPO-E04 Dome Lens Port use for the photographs. Lighting was two Fantasea Radiant 1600 Video Lights.

 

 

Columcille Megalith Park

While I was searching for a place to photograph fall foliage I cam access this wonderful park located near Bangor, PA.

A land of myth and mystery located in the Appalachian Mountains of eastern Pennsylvania. The park rooted in Celtic spirituality and inspired by the Isle of Iona off the coast of Scotland. It’s an outdoor sanctuary open to the public as a sacred space for quiet meditation.

St. Oran Bell Tower

St. Oran Bell Tower

 

Thor's Gate, Columcille Megalith Park, Bangor, Pennsylvania, United States, © 2017 Bob Hahn

Thor’s Gate

St. Columba Chapel , Columcille Megalith Park, Bangor, Pennsylvania, United States, © 2017 Bob Hahn

St. Columba Chapel

Megaliths, Columcille Megalith Park, Bangor, Pennsylvania, United States, © 2017 Bob Hahn

Megaliths

Bell, Columcille Megalith Park, Bangor, Pennsylvania, United States, © 2017 Bob Hahn

Bell

 

 

Glens Natural Area

Glens Natural Area at Ricketts Glen State Park in Pennsylvania is a National Natural Landmark.

The Falls Trail allows you to explore the glens, which has wild, free-flowing waterfalls cascading through rock-strewn clefts. It has 22 named waterfalls and has diverse wildlife.

 

#GetOlympus #BobHahnPhoto #Waterfalls #GlensNaturalArea #RickettsGlenStatePark

Hoover Mason Trestle Re-visited

The Hoover Mason Trestle in the evening.

The Hoover-Mason Trestle at Sunset

Moon rise at the Trestle

Hoover-Mason Trestle

Location: SteelStacks, 711 First Street, Bethlehem, PA 18015

Hoover Mason Trestle

Hoover-Mason Trestle

The Hoover Mason Trestle, at the former Bethlehem Steel Plant, used as a narrow gauge railroad to carry the coke, limestone and iron ore to make the iron from the ore yards to the blast furnaces. Now a public walkway designed to be a museum,  community recreation resource and attraction.  The trestle stands 46 feet tall and 2,000 feet long. Opened on June 25, the Hoover Mason Trestle located along the blast furnaces with one entrance at the Visitor Center and another at either end of the Gas Blowing Engine House providing access from the Sands parking lot or PBS 39 end of the campus.

The Hoover-Mason Trestle was completed in 1907 and named after the Chicago-based engineers who designed it. For over 80 years, cars delivered raw materials including limestone, iron ore, and coke to the blast furnaces. Men worked around the clock, in three shifts, emptying carloads of materials into storage bins below.

The blast furnaces operated continuously and required constant feeding of materials. Tons of limestone, iron ore or pellets, and coke would be loaded into the furnace in layers. Hot air was blown in near the bottom to fuel the reaction.

Hoover-Mason Trestle

The Blower House generated the “wind” for the blast furnaces. Inside this building, rows of giant gas-powered engines pumped pressurized air out to the stoves. The stoves heated the air before it was forced into the furnace. This hot pressurized air reacted with the coke (fuel), producing intense heat and carbon monoxide.

Hoover-Mason Trestle

Location: SteelStacks, 711 First Street, Bethlehem, PA 18015

Olympus Demo at Dutch Springs Expo Weekend

Challenger 600 Dutch Springs, Bethlehem, PA, © 2016 Bob Hahn, Olympus OMD/E-M1 OLYMPUS M.7-14mm F2.8 at 7 mm, ISO 800 Exposure: 1/60@f/5

Challenger 600 Dutch Springs, Bethlehem, PA, © 2016 Bob Hahn, Olympus OMD/E-M1 OLYMPUS M.7-14mm F2.8 at 7 mm, ISO 800 Exposure: 1/60@f/5

Dutch Springs is holding it’s 1st Annual Expo Weekend  June 3-4, 2017.

Join us to demo the latest Olympus Cameras and housings. I will be doing seminars on Saturday and Sunday. Stop by our booth to register for a door prize.

Many leading manufacturers in the Dive Industry will demo their dive gear.

Dutch Spring’s dive safety seminar series will kick off this weekend.

Dutch Springs, located in Bethlehem, PA, is a 50-acre lake, with attractions at depths up to 100 feet. The lake is spring-fed from an underground aquifer that filters through limestone to provide excellent visibility. Explore underwater platforms, submerged vehicles, aircraft and other unusual sites. Enjoy a variety of interesting fish and aquatic life, including Rainbow Trout, Largemouth Bass, Bluegills, Palomino Trout, Koi, Yellow Perch and Goldfish. Visit their website www.dutchsprings.com for more information.

#Olympus #Underwater Photography #Dutch Springs #Bob Hahn Photo

 

Cornwall Furnace

Cornwall Furnace is indeed a unique survivor of the early American iron industry. Originally built by Peter Grubb in 1742, the furnace underwent extensive renovations in 1856-57 under its subsequent owners, the Coleman family, and closed in 1883. It is this mid-19th century iron making complex which survives today. At Cornwall, furnace, blast equipment, and related buildings still stand as they did over a century ago. Here visitors can explore the rambling Gothic Revival buildings where cannons, stoves, and pig iron were cast, and where men labored day and night to satisfy the furnace’s appetite for charcoal, limestone, and iron ore.

Cornwall Iron Furnace is part of a National Historic Landmark District by the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service. It has also been designated a National Historical Landmark by the American Society of Metals, and a National Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, citing Cornwall Furnace as “the only one of America’s hundreds of 19th century charcoal fueled blast furnaces to survive fully intact.”

Photos taken with a Olympus E-M1 Mark II with Olympus M.7-14mm F2.8 and M.12-100mm F4.0 Lens. Photos were shot in camera raw and made into high dynamic range (HDR) images using Google Nik Collection HDR Efex Pro 2.